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International Childhood Cancer Day 2019 Donate now


Each year, an estimated 215 000 cancers are diagnosed in children younger than 15 years, and about 85 000 cancers in those aged 15–19 years. These estimates are based on data collected by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) from population-based cancer registries around the world.
International Childhood Cancer Day 2019 Press Release

IARC Press Release 265

International Childhood Cancer Day 2019 – Providing better cancer data will help reduce the burden of childhood cancer

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Interviews

Interviews

Dr Eva Steliarova-Foucher, Scientist, Section of Cancer Surveillance.

IARC is part of the WHO Global Initiative for Childhood Cancer, which aims to reach a survival rate of at least 60% for children with cancer globally by 2030.

To mark International Childhood Cancer Day 2019, IARC Scientist Dr Eva Steliarova-Foucher, of the IARC Section of Cancer Surveillance, explains why it is so important to collect high-quality data on childhood cancer incidence and survival, as well as how income inequality affects this undertaking.
Ms Line Frederiksen, IARC visiting PhD student.

To mark International Childhood Cancer Day 2019, Ms Line Frederiksen presents her work on the socioeconomic life of childhood cancer survivors. Ms Frederiksen is a PhD student in the Childhood Cancer Research Group at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen, Denmark, and a visiting PhD student at IARC.

Her work is part of the Socioeconomic Consequences in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (SALiCCS) research programme, which is a Nordic collaboration between cancer researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, the Finnish Cancer Registry, and the Danish Cancer Society Research Center.
Videos

Videos

Dr Catherine Metayer, University of California at Berkeley.
Dr Catherine Metayer of the University of California at Berkeley, USA, is the chair of the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). She describes how IARC has been involved with CLIC, and how the consortium has established factors that affect the risk of leukaemia, to help inform prevention efforts.
Dr Richard Saffery, Melbourne, Australia.
Dr Richard Saffery of the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, studies childhood cancer with IARC as part of the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium (I4C). He describes his work with IARC and the results of an investigation into whether the epigenetic profile of children who develop cancer is different at birth.

Dr Terence Dwyer, Melbourne, Australia.
Dr Terence Dwyer of the George Institute for Global Health, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, explains how, thanks to IARC’s involvement, scientists around the world are contributing data to the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium (I4C). The goal of the study is to provide the first prospective evidence of potential causes of childhood cancer.
Infographic

Infographic


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